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Does Your Nintendo Switch Screen Have Dead Pixels? It's Normal, Says Nintendo

5 March 2017, 9:00 pm EST By Aaron Mamiit Tech Times
The latest issue for the Nintendo Switch is the dead pixels that users have found on the hybrid console's screen. However, according to Nintendo, the permanently white or black specks on the device's display are normal.  ( Drew Angerer | Getty Images )

The Nintendo Switch had a successful March 3 global launch, but there are already a variety of issues being attached to the hybrid console.

The latest problem that early owners of the Nintendo Switch have pointed out are dead pixels on the hybrid console's screen. However, according to Nintendo, such a thing is normal, which is a claim that many users do not find acceptable.

Dead Pixels On The Nintendo Switch

Some users who have been able to acquire units of the high-demand device have found the display of the Nintendo Switch to have dead pixels, which show up as specks on the screen that remain permanently white or black.

While some customers will not mind having a dead pixel or two on their Nintendo Switch display, it is understandable that there are some users who would not want to see such bright or dark specks on their new console, especially after paying at least $300 for it and possibly also going through great lengths just to acquire it.

Nintendo Switch Dead Pixels Not A Defect, Says Nintendo

For Nintendo Switch owners who would want to have their hybrid consoles replaced due to dead pixels, it might be hard to do so now considering how short supply is for the device compared to the massive demand.

In addition, according to the troubleshooting page for the dead pixels on the Nintendo Switch, Nintendo claims that small numbers of such are a characteristic of LCD screens. The company goes on to say that dead pixels are a normal occurrence, and their appearance on the screen of the Nintendo Switch should not be seen as a defect.

Are Dead Pixels On LCD Screens Really Normal?

One or two dead pixels are indeed normal on LCD screens, but with the developments being made in manufacturing processes, the issue has been largely addressed. In addition, several device manufacturers have dead pixel policies that outline what can be considered a defective screen in terms of the number of dead pixels found on it.

However, for the Nintendo Switch, the company has not released such a policy for dead pixels on the hybrid console's screen. Customers who would like to have their units replaced due to the presence of dead pixels will likely have to resort to individual complaints made to retailers and to Nintendo itself. Nintendo Switch owners should know that back in 2004, Nintendo bowed to customer pressure and fixed Nintendo DS portable systems with dead pixels, so something of the sort is possible with the company's latest console.

Other Nintendo Switch Issues

In addition to dead pixels on the screen, Nintendo Switch owners have experienced other issues that have dampened the hybrid console's launch.

One of the more high-profile issues for the Nintendo Switch is that the hybrid console's display is prone to acquiring hairline scratches just by inserting it into its dock. This is because the Nintendo Switch screen is covered by plastic, which is softer and not scratch-resistant compared to the glass used to cover smartphone and tablet displays.

Nintendo Switch owners have also experienced connectivity issues with the Joy-Con controllers, to which Nintendo suggested that players keep away from aquariums and microwave ovens.

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