Do you want to tell us anything else about you? This common interview question will be asked at the end of job interviews. It's a polite way of closing the interview and ensuring the candidate doesn't have any further questions for the hiring manager.

What should a job candidate say?

How to answer "Do you want to tell us anything else about you" in a job interview

Here's how to answer this interview question:

1. Conclude the interview

Conclude the interview. Don't tell a long story. Ensure the interviewer has everything they need to move forward in the interview process.

2. Include a relevant question

Ask the interviewer a relevant question about the job, hiring process, or about them. Ensuring the hiring manager feels the candidate is excited and interested in the opportunity.

3. End the interview

Conclude the interview. Thank the interviewer for their time. And follow-up by email if the candidate doesn't hear a response within three business days.

Try to ask questions about the job

As the interview comes to a close, it's great to ask questions about the job. It shows interest in the conversation. And interest in the position. As a job seeker, having questions prepared in advance can assist with this process.

Before choosing questions to ask at the end of the interview, be sure to bring a note pad and paper. Include the questions as part of a list. And then check each question that was answered by regular interview conversation.

Here are sample answers to the interview question "Do you want to tell us anything else about you?" And using questions about the job as an interview response.

Sample answer: "There's nothing that comes to mind. But I would love to learn more about this quarter's objectives for the role. Can we discuss that by email?"

Sample answer: "I hope I summed up my work history in the cover letter and resume. But I would love to learn more about whom this position reports to. And what their objectives are for the role."

Sample answer: "I believe I summed up my past the best I could. But I would love to learn about the previous employee in this position. What role did they move to? Was there decent upward mobility for them?"

Or ask questions about the hiring process

Similarly to answering the interview question with questions about the job. A candidate can ask questions about the hiring process. It can be an informative way to set expectations. And can assist a candidate in understanding how soon they will hear back from the hiring manager.

Here are sample answers to the interview question "Do you want to tell us anything else about you?" And using questions about the hiring process as an interview response.

Sample answer: "I don't have anything else that comes to mind. But I would love to learn more about how soon is the position going to be placed? Will it be in one week? Or in the next few weeks? Or next month?"

Sample answer: "I don't have any further questions or information to share. But I would love to learn more about the next steps. If this interview went well, will I come back for a second interview? What's the normal hiring process at XYZ Company?"

Sample answer: "Nothing comes to mind for me. But I would love to learn more about whom this position reports to and what they're looking for in an ideal candidate. Can I email you with questions about the hiring process?"

Lastly, ask questions about the hiring manager

Questions about the hiring manager are acceptable to ask. Avoid personal questions that could make the hiring manager feel uncomfortable. A personal question consists of anything related to their marital status, preferred gender, or similar.

To answer this interview question with inquiries about the hiring manager, try these samples.

Sample answer: "I don't think there's anything that comes to mind that I'd like to share. But I would love to learn more about what motivates you in this work environment. What are the reasons you love working here? And what gets you up in the morning? And wanting to come to work?"

Sample answer: "Nothing comes to mind. And, I would love to learn what you value about the work environment here. How would you describe collaboration in the workplace? And what would you tell someone who is starting their first day here?"

Sample answer: "No, I believe I shared it all. Although, I would love to learn what advice you would have provided yourself on your first day here? What's one thing you would tell someone in their first 30-60-90 days of employment here at XYZ Company?"

Tip: It can be helpful to refer to resources that suggest questions to ask the interviewer at the end of an interview.

Why asking questions is important

And if the candidate performed the job interview correctly. Then information shared on the resume and cover letter should be understood. Leaving the hiring manager having no further questions about the candidate.

Leaving the candidate the opportunity to display a further engagement in the job opportunity. By asking questions. Questions at the end of the interview can show a strong passion and desire to be employed with the business. And it can make the hiring manager "think." Making it easier to send a thank-you email after the interview. Recapping something significant from the interview.

Mistakes to avoid

Here are mistakes to avoid when answering this interview question.

Telling a long story

This is a closing question for the hiring manager. Not an opportunity to share a long personal story. Avoid telling a long story at the end of the interview.

It can risk having the hiring manager be late for their other interviews. And shows disregard for their time. It's disrespectful. And it could leave the hiring manager not wanting to pursue the candidate.

Having nothing to say

Similar to sharing a longer story, having nothing to say is not great. It's best to be prepared with a great way to close the interview. A method that continues the conversation and encourages the next steps in the interview process.

Avoid having nothing to say. The answer might look like this. "I don't really have anything else to share. Is the interview complete?" An answer like this can make the hiring manager feel like the candidate isn't interested in the job.

Additional Job Seeker Resources

About the guest author

Patrick Algrim is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW), NCDA Certified Career Counselor (CCC), and general career expert. Patrick has completed the NACE Coaching Certification Program (CCP). And has been published as a career expert on Forbes, Glassdoor, American Express, Reader's Digest, LiveCareer, Zety, Yahoo, Recruiter.com, and many others. 

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