Omote face tracking and projection mapping system is amazingly creepy: Here's why

By Aaron Mamiit, Tech Times | August 19, 6:53 AM

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Omote

The Omote system can be viewed as electronic male-up, with computer graphics projected onto a person's face. The development of the technology was led by artist Nobumichi Asai.
(Photo : Nobumichi Asai)

Omote, a system that combines motion tracking and projection mapping systems, projects computer graphics onto a location that has not yet been done before.

Omote projects computer graphics onto the human face, and the results are both outstanding and creepy.

Projecting computer graphics onto objects such as the sides of buildings or vehicles is not new, as many companies have used the technology in the past, often as a marketing gimmick. However, as with all forms of technology, it will continue to develop and expand, as what happened with Omote.

Omote is the result of collaboration that was led by artist Nobumichi Asai, featuring contributions from CGI experts, graphic designers and make-up artists.

Asai has worked in the past with major companies such as Subaru to project computer graphics onto subjects. However, the locations where the graphics are projected onto in the past were all stationary, so the ability of the Omote to follow the person's face as it moves and adapt its projections accordingly is a huge development for the system.

Essentially, Omote can be viewed as electronic make-up, with the ability to project practically anything on a person's face.

The technical specifications of the Omote system have not yet been released. However, a video of the system at work shows that there is a scanning stage at the start of the process. In this stage, it can be assumed that the face of the person will be mapped, including every little detail on his or her face.

After scanning, Omote then projects the computer graphics onto the person's face. The graphics are overlaid on all the contours of the person's face, and are manipulated to follow in real-time as the person moves.

While it is not yet clear on how much movement the Omote system can handle, the technology is still very impressive. Whether the system can follow a person's face while walking on a runway, for example, remains to be seen.

Asai is noted to have worked in the past with theater, which could be a spectacular outlet for this technology if it can handle the big movements made by actors onstage.

As Asai released a video demonstrating the Omote system, it is also known that Microsoft is working on an immersive environment that is based on the projection of computer graphics, which has been named IllumiRoom. Microsoft is looking to expand the capabilities of the Xbox One with this system, bringing games from within the TV onto the surfaces of the room where the gamers are playing.

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