Headline News

  • Motorola Debuts The Moto X Style, We Go Hands-On
  • The Driverless Car Debate: How Safe Are Autonomous Vehicles?
  • In Defense Of 'Waterworld': A Closer Look At One Of Hollywood's Most Infamous Busts

Motorola Debuts The Moto X Style, We Go Hands-On

Motorola Debuts The Moto X Style, We Go Hands-On

Hands-on With the latest version of Motorola's flagship handset.

The Driverless Car Debate: How Safe Are Autonomous Vehicles?

The Driverless Car Debate: How Safe Are Autonomous Vehicles?

As companies like Google and Delphi Automotive continue to test autonomous vehicles on the road, issues concerning the safety in regard to accidents and vulnerability in the software continue to rise. How safe are autonomous cars?

In Defense Of 'Waterworld': A Closer Look At One Of Hollywood's Most Infamous Busts

In Defense Of 'Waterworld': A Closer Look At One Of Hollywood's Most Infamous Busts

'Waterworld' came out 20 years ago, with Hollywood immediately considering it a failure thanks to the film going over budget before its release. However, now, with today's standards, 'Waterworld' is no longer a flop.

Latest News

SCIENCEScientists Are Making Lasers Out Of Pig Fat

Scientists Are Making Lasers Out Of Pig Fat

As if anyone needed another reason to love pig fat, scientists are now turning it into cellular lasers. Besides being a lot of fun to play around with, the lasers could help scientists learn about cells in new ways.

SCIENCEScience Images Of The Week: Origami Bunnies Made Of DNA, A Cosmic Collision And More

Science Images Of The Week: Origami Bunnies Made Of DNA, A Cosmic Collision And More

From the enormous scale of two cosmically intertwined stars to the extremely tiny scale of intricately folded strands of DNA, this week's science news revealed a diverse array of amazing images. We also got an update on the famous 'Blue Marble' photo, and learned the science behind the mysterious phenomenon of hair ice.

SCIENCEFruit Flies Show They May Be Self-Aware By Playing A Video Game

Fruit Flies Show They May Be Self-Aware By Playing A Video Game

Scientists set up fruit flies to essentially play a virtual reality video game to test whether these insects are self-aware. Their results suggest that the flies were actually aware they were controlling the avatars on the screen.

SCIENCEThis Week In Space: Humans On The Moon And Intelligent Aliens In The Universe

Space

This Week In Space: Humans On The Moon And Intelligent Aliens In The Universe

If you thought that space news was going to quiet down now that last week’s Pluto flyby climax has passed, you were wrong. New plans to return to the moon, the announcement of the largest-ever project focused on finding intelligent alien life, and the successful journey of three new people to the International Space Station were just a few of this week’s exciting developments.

SCIENCEScientists Discover Potential 'Earth 2.0' In Kepler Mission's Data

Space

Scientists Discover Potential 'Earth 2.0' In Kepler Mission's Data

After going over data obtained by NASA's Kepler spacecraft, scientists recently discovered a planet slightly larger than Earth existing in its star's habitable zone, potentially making it a good candidate for hosting life.

LifeMosquirix, World's First Malaria Vaccine, Gets Thumbs Up From European Medicine Agency

Health

Mosquirix, World's First Malaria Vaccine, Gets Thumbs Up From European Medicine Agency

Bill Gates has funded research that has developed a new vaccine against malaria. What is the billionaire doing for the world?

SCIENCEMegafauna Extinction Driven Mainly By Climate Change, Not Humans

Megafauna Extinction Driven Mainly By Climate Change, Not Humans

Samples of ancient DNA from fossils of megafauna like mammoths reveal that the extinction of large land mammals correlates more closely with warming climates than the arrival of humans. The researchers looked at these trends at an unprecedented evolution that allowed them to uncover strong evidence to the contrary of the prevailing theory that humans caused the demise of megafauna.

SCIENCEScientists Use Tiny Lasers To Make Cells Glow

Scientists Use Tiny Lasers To Make Cells Glow

Scientists have figured out how to insert tiny lasers into cells to track them through the human body. The implications of such research could increase the understanding of certain cells, particularly those associated with cancer.

SCIENCEHow Fireflies Can Help Light The Way To Earlier Disease Diagnosis

How Fireflies Can Help Light The Way To Earlier Disease Diagnosis

Scientists have found a way to use a modified version of the molecule responsible for fireflies' signature glow to illuminate signs of disease. This new firefly-enabled technique could help doctors diagnose diseases, including cancer, more quickly.

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