High intake of salt in obese teens causes cells to age faster: Study

By Rhodi Lee, Tech Times | March 21, 7:56 AM

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A new research has linked salt intake and teen obesity. The findings should not be taken with a grain of salt.
(Photo : Wikimedia Commons)

Salted food may taste good but there are a number of reasons why you should cut back on your salt intake. Consuming too much salt, for instance, can make you more at risk of stroke, stomach cancer and heart failure. The healthy practice of avoiding too much salt isn't also just for older adults. High salt intake also has negative effects on teenagers particularly those who are overweight.

In a new study presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014, researchers found that overweight teenagers who consume too much salt exhibit signs of faster cell aging.

In their study, the researchers divided 766 subjects, who were between 14 and 18-years old, into two groups based on whether they consume more than 4,100 mg of salt a day or less than 2,400 mg of salt a day. The subjects in both groups notably consume more than the American Heart Association's recommended 1,500 mg of salt serving per day.

The researchers observed that the protective ends of the chromosome called telomeres, which naturally shorten with age, were much shorter in overweight and obese subjects with high salt intake but not in teens with normal weight but high salt intake.

"Even in these relatively healthy young people, we can already see the effect of high sodium intake, suggesting that high sodium intake and obesity may act synergistically to accelerate cellular aging," said study lead author Haidong Zhu, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University in Augusta, Georgia.

Zhu said that overweight teenagers who want to reduce their risk of heart disease should consider reducing their salt intake and this may even be easier than losing weight.

"Lowering sodium intake, especially if you are overweight or obese, may slow down the cellular aging process that plays an important role in the development of heart disease," Zhu said. "Lowering sodium intake may be an easier first step than losing weight for overweight young people who want to lower their risk of heart disease,"

Zhu also pointed out that most of the salt in the diet comes from processed food and urged parents to prepare fresh and healthier foods more often.

"The majority of sodium in the diet comes from processed foods, so parents can help by cooking fresh meals more often and by offering fresh fruit rather than potato chips for a snack," Zhu said.

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