Some researchers claimed that their new dyes could identify if an EV's electric motor is no longer usable. If this is true, then their latest invention could help consumers save their money by preventing useless or unnecessary motor replacements in the future. 

New Dyes Could Prevent Useless Electric Motor Replacements: Here's How It Can Help EVs, Including Tesla
(Photo : Photo by Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images)
The Tesla Model S electric vehicle seen plugged in on the show floor during the press preview for the world automotive press at North American International Auto Show in Cobo Center January 12, 2010 in Detroit, Michigan. The 2010 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) opens to the public January 16th.

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The latest study was conducted by researchers and other electric car experts at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg or MLU. Aside from them, scientists at the ELANTAS, a division of the specialty chemicals group ALTANA, also joined the new experiment. 

They were able to develop a new process that allows them to directly integrate their dyes into the insulation. The involved scientists explained that these new dyes change color to reveal how much the insulating resin layer around the copper wires in the motor has degraded. 

This seems to be a great innovation for Tesla to adapt. However, the giant EV manufacturer hasn't released any statement if it will integrate the new dyes in its Tesla models. 

To help you further, here's what they discovered during the latest dye experiment. 

Dyes Can Prevent Useless Electric Motor Replacements? 

The new study entitled "Self‐Diagnostic Polymers-Inline Detection of Thermal Degradation of Unsaturated Poly(ester imide)s" was published in the journal Wiley Online Library

New Dyes Could Prevent Useless Electric Motor Replacements: Here's How It Can Help EVs, Including Tesla
(Photo : Photo by Bryan Mitchell/Getty Images)
A CT&T electric vehicle charging station is displayed during the press preview for the world automotive media North American International Auto Show at the Cobo Center January 12, 2010 in Detroit, Michigan. The 2010 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) opens to the public January 16th.

In this paper, the scientists explained how their new dyes work to prevent unnecessary electric motor replacements. 

"Monitoring polymer degradation is an important quest, particularly relevant for industry," explained the researchers. "Although many indirect methodologies for assessing polymer degradation exist, only a few are applicable for an inline‐monitoring via optic detection‐systems." 

According to Phys Org's latest report, Alexander Funtan, one of the leading chemists at MLU, said that they were able to develop a test rig that can analyze four different resin systems over several months. 

He added that it can determine which degradation products form at different temperatures. Thanks to their innovation, the new dyes can help various electric car owners identify if they really need to replace their motors.  

How the New Dyes Work? 

The involved scientists explained that different color spectra could be analyzed using special devices. They added that these gadgets could be installed directly in the engine of an electric car. 

Thanks to this method, EV owners can now identify if a replacement is really necessary. The new dyes are not the only innovation developed to improve the electric car experience. 

Previously, an ex-NASA expert shared his wireless charging system. Aside from this, Ford also created an app that can tell users how much headphones can slow down their reaction time. 

This just shows that various organizations and companies are making efforts to make electric driving safer and advance. 

For more news updates about EV and other related stories, always keep your tabs open here at TechTimes. 

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Written by: Griffin Davis

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