The next-generation iPhone 6s will reportedly use System in Package (SiP) modular architecture like the Apple Watch, switching from the current Printed Circuit Boards (PCB).

We're still several months away from the launch of the iPhone 6s, or iPhone 7, but rumors and leaks are already trying to anticipate what's to come and this is not the first time that SiPs are rumored for the handset.

Rumors claiming that Apple plans to switch from PCBs to SiPs first surfaced back in mid-2014 in relation to the company's smartwatch. Not long after, the Apple Watch made its official debut and did indeed come with a SiP instead of a PCB. From there on, it didn't take too long for additional reports and leaks to surface, hinting that the next-generation iPhone should make the jump to SiP as well.

A new report from China Times now further bolsters such claims. Citing supply chain sources, the report claims that Apple will make "extensive" use of SIP architecture for its iPhone 6s.

This modular architecture called SiP means that multiple components such as the processor, RAM and storage are housed in a single package that's more compact compared to the current iPhone architecture. SiPs can play a big role in achieving a thin and compact device, which suggests the next iPhone will come with a sleek design.

It's also worth pointing out, however, that previous rumors suggested the iPhone 6s may come with a combination of PCB with SiP, paving the way for eliminating PCBs in 2016 smartphones.

In addition to a new architecture, the iPhone 6s is further expected to boast several other improvements over its predecessor. The 2015 flagship iPhone is also rumored to feature Apple's new Force Touch technology, as well as a more powerful processor, more RAM, improved cameras, enhanced OS features and more.

Considering Apple's launch cycles so far, the next-generation iPhone will likely debut by the end of September or early October at the latest. Apple has yet to disclose any information in regards to its 2015 iPhone, which means that everything remains in the rumor state at this point. As always in such cases, take all leaks and reports with a grain of salt until formal confirmation.

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