Krokodil, the Russian flesh eating zombie drug, may have killed its first victim in the U.S.

Krokodil is believed to dissolve the skin of its user over time and can also create green scaly scarring from which it gets the name. The flesh eating drug is said to have originated in Russia but was also found in the U.S. recently in Utah, Arizona and Illinois.

The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics is investigating the deaths of two Oklahoma men who are said to have died after Krokodil use. A father of four children, Justin McGree, died in 2012 and his friend Chelle Fancher says that McGee had taken Krokodil. If The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics confirms that McGee used Krokodil, then the drug will claim its first victim in the country.

Two sisters from Joliet, Illinois, Amber and Angie Neitzel, say that they have been using Krokodil for around a year and a half, indicating that the dangerous drug has been in the U.S. for much longer than originally thought.

The sisters claim that they were under the impression that they are using heroin and were unaware that they were actually using Krokodil.  

According to a MailOnline report, the sisters preferred the new drug because it cost them a tenth of the price of normal heroin and also gave them an "incredibly intense high."

Unfortunately, just weeks into the use of the drug, the sisters developed lesions and sores on their legs and arms.

Angie was once rushed to the hospital in the middle of the night due to severe stomach pains. Angie is receiving after care from Dr Abhin Singla, who also confirmed to MailOnline that both the sisters are using Krokodil. Dr Singla also informed that he has seen five cases of Krokodil use.

"You can get marks and bleeding from shooting up heroin, but nothing like this. They are deep holes and the skin is just rotting away. It's hard to describe how revolting they are," says Amber.

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will have to deal with the Krokodil swiftly and find and eliminate the source of the dangerous drug. 

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