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Drone Footage Captures 70 Sharks Devouring Humpback Whale

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An ocean cruise company in Australia has captured a rare video footage of several massive sharks tearing a dead whale apart in the water.

Eco Abrolhos Cruises uploaded a video clip on its Facebook page showing at least 70 tiger sharks devouring the carcass of a whale at Shark Bay near Dirk Hartog Island in Western Australia. The footage was taken using a drone while the company was conducting its 14-day cruise from Geraldton to Broome.

The shark feeding frenzy was witnessed by Eco Abrolhos Cruises' passengers as well as by other tourists who were riding boats in the area at the time.

Neil Edwards, a tourist who was on one of the boats at Shark Bay, described the natural event as "truly amazing." He said that the footage taken using the GoPro camera and the drone exceeded the pictures and videos he was able to capture himself.

Eco Abrolhos Cruises' video has already garnered over 400,000 views since it was uploaded on Facebook over the weekend.

One Facebook user commented that videos, such as the one the cruise company uploaded, make it difficult for people to pretend that there are no sharks in the water.

Another user wrote that even if he was an avid fan of sharks, he wouldn't want to jump in the water during such a shark feeding frenzy.

Despite praising Eco Abrolhos Cruises' rare footage of the scene at Shark Bay, one user said that he wishes that the company could have arrived at the area earlier so that it could have captured a clearer image before the blood muddled the water.

The area where the footage was taken is known to have one of the largest populations of tiger sharks in the world. These massive creatures can reach sizes of up to 7 meters (about 23 feet) long and weigh up to 520 kilograms (1,146 pounds).

Earlier this month, a drone hobbyist was able to film a group of false killer whales stalking and devouring a small shark in waters off the coast of Cronulla near Sydney.

The footage shows the false killer whales following the shark for a while as if to tire the lone animal. They then snag the shark and drag it down to deeper parts of the ocean in order to devour.

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