HPV Vaccine Reduces Risk of Cervical Cancer by 90%
(Photo : CDC on Unsplash)
American Cancer Society Recommends Kids younger than 15 should get 2 HPV Vaccines starting at 9 years old
(Photo : CDC/Unsplash) In this 2017 photo, captured inside a clinical setting, a health care provider was placing a bandage on the injection site of a child, who had just received a seasonal influenza vaccine. Children younger than 5-years-old, and especially those younger than 2-years-old, are at high risk of developing serious flu-related complications. A flu vaccine offers the best defense against flu, and its potentially serious consequences, and can also reduce the spread of flu to others.

The HPV Vaccine (human papillomavirus) has shown a massive help in reducing cervical cancer risk for women by as much as ninety percent (90%) to those that already have it. The vaccine has been long recommended for individuals of every gender to have, especially as they grow older and become more sexually active, as it is a need to avoid STDs.

HPV Vaccine Reduces Cervical Cancer Risk by 90 Percent

HPV Vaccine Reduces Risk of Cervical Cancer by 90%
(Photo : CDC on Unsplash)

HPV Vaccines can do more for a person, and it is a potential life-saving shot for women that could develop cervical cancer in the long run. According to the studies published via The Lancet, the Human Papillomavirus vaccine can help in reducing the risk of contracting Cervical Cancer by as much as 90 percent. 

The vaccine has been around for decades now and is continuously developed by researchers to adapt to modern times and bring a better immunization factor for those that receive it. As many as 300,000 women globally are dying from Cervical Cancer, and this is one of the most common forms of cancer among the gender. 

Read Also: UK Approves First COVID-19 Pill | Molnupiravir Already Helps Flu Patients-A Game Changer This Pandemic?

HPV Vaccine, Is it Recommended Now?

The World Health Organization is recommending the use of HPV vaccines to adolescent and teenage girls to eliminate the growing case of cervical cancer among women. The form of cancer is known to develop or show its signs to young adults, with some having it at their middle ages.

The vaccine is also recommended for other genders and everyone to avoid contracting HPV. 

HPV Vaccine and its Awareness

American Cancer Society Recommends Kids younger than 15 should get 2 HPV Vaccines starting at 9 years old
(Photo : CDC/Unsplash)
In this 2017 photo, captured inside a clinical setting, a health care provider was placing a bandage on the injection site of a child, who had just received a seasonal influenza vaccine. Children younger than 5-years-old, and especially those younger than 2-years-old, are at high risk of developing serious flu-related complications. A flu vaccine offers the best defense against flu, and its potentially serious consequences, and can also reduce the spread of flu to others.

There has been a massive connection between HPV and cancer in the past studies of researchers and those concerned with the virus-bringing disease that has adverse effects on its victims. The awareness of HPV and its vaccine has been pressed on by the government and health agencies, especially as people are getting infections at an increasing pace. 

The awareness for HPV and its difference with HIV are still taboo to the public, as most people are immediately disgusted when hearing these two words. Nevertheless, this is something that is still under study from scientists and experts, as a lot of them are still in search of the vaccine and its cure that is still unavailable to humans. 

HPV is still an alarming virus that infects thousands of people globally, and the need for its vaccine is recommended for the growing population of this planet. Moreover, its awareness should be welcomed and not be considered taboo as it brings more benefits than its originally-intended focus, being of help to women who are likely to develop cervical cancer. 

Related Article: HPV and Cancer: How are These Connected?

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Written by Isaiah Richard

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