The Bloodhound project, a global engineering adventure meant to capture the interest of people and inspire the next generation of engineers and scientists across the globe, began its plan to reach a goal of 1,000 mph World Land Speed Record in 2008. On Sept. 24, the Bloodhound Supersonic Car, tagged as the world's most powerful racing car, will make its debut.

Around 8,000 people are expected to witness the unveiling of the Bloodhound Supersonic Car at Canary Wharf in London.

The UK-built car which boasts a rocket system is expected to break the existing land speed record, which stands at 763 mph, when driven at full speed.

Next year, the supersonic racer is slated to undergo 200 mph trials at Newquay Aerohub in Cornwall, prior to its planned run on a specially prepared desert venue in South Africa.

At full speed, the car, which comes with three power plants, has the capacity to cover a mile in just 3.6 seconds.

Bloodhound houses these power plants enabling it to move faster than the speed of sound: a cluster of Nammo hybrid rockets, a Rolls-Royce EJ200 jet from a Eurofighter Typhoon, as well as a Jaguar V8 engine driving the rocket oxidizer pump.

The team behind the Bloodhound said the supersonic car has 135,000 thrust horsepower.

In terms of dimensions, this pencil-shaped supercar is 6-feet in diameter and 44-feet long. Additionally, it weighs 7.5 tons.

"Public interest in the project is incredible and thanks to the generous support of our partners we are delighted to able to bring Bloodhound to London and put it on show," said Richard Noble, the project director of Bloodhound. "With the car now built and the track in South Africa prepared, our focus is on racing in 2016."

Current record holder Andy Green, 52, will drive the Bloodhound supersonic car. He achieved the record in Thrust SSC at Black Rock in Nevada way back in 1997.

Meanwhile, visitors at the event will also be given the chance to enter the cockpit, which is equipped with a sophisticated dashboard.

In March, we reported that the car sports bullet-proof paneling and wheels that spin faster than 170 revolutions per second, to make sure that Green's world record attempt will not be his last ride.

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