Harley-Davidson introduced the company's first electric motorcycle, with a first look at handmade models of the machine in an exclusive event in New York next week.

The electric motorcycle, named the LiveWire, is looking to be the first full-size electric motorcycle to enter and succeed in the mainstream United States market, as there has been relatively low interest in electric motorcycles apart from scooters and simple commuter bikes. 

Harley-Davidson says that the company has the marketing capabilities to drive up demand for the LiveWire. In addition, the company's initiatives to put up charging stations and develop electric motorcycle technology will benefit the consumers and the entire industry.

"Project LiveWire is more like the first electric guitar - not an electric car," said Harley-Davidson senior vice president Mark-Hans Richer.

"It's an expression of individuality and iconic style that just happens to be electric. Project LiveWire is a bold statement for us as a company and a brand."

The LiveWire uses a lithium-ion battery and creates 75 horsepower, going from zero to 60 mph in four seconds and a maximum speed of 90 mph. The design of the LiveWire looks futuristic, with an exoskeleton made of aluminum supported by 18-inch tires.

And if releasing an electric motorcycle isn't unlike Harley-Davidson enough, the LiveWire also eschews the traditional sounds of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle that rumbles when idle and roars when throttled. Instead, the LiveWire has a quiet engine that only emits a high-pitched squeal similar to a jet plane engine.

"America at its best has always been about reinvention," said Matt Levatich, Harley-Davidson's COO in a statement.

"And, like America, Harley-Davidson has reinvented itself many times in our history, which customers leading us every step of the way. Project LiveWire is another exciting, customer-led moment in our history." 

Other new features for the LiveWire include turn signal and headlights that use LEDs and a torque system that is able to instantly respond to any kind of turn of the throttle. 

The LiveWire, however, can only go a maximum of 100 to 130 miles before a recharge is needed, which takes up to three hours. 

Harley-Davidson will introduce the LiveWire to the public through a tour along the iconic Route 66, stopping at over 30 Harley-Davidson outlets so consumers can test drive the two dozen LiveWires that will take part in the journey. 

The LiveWire will likely go on sale next year, but the price for the electric motorcycle has not yet been released.

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