COVID-19 pandemic might be a burden for those people who have a hard time transitioning into the new normal. 

However, a recent study conducted by a team of researchers said that coronavirus-related memes could alleviate a person's mood. It could also help them to cope up properly with stress during this situation.

Survey About Memes Amid COVID Pandemic

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(Photo : ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images))
Bill Wyatt, owner of the Y Que Trading Post in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, wearing a Donald Trump face mask, displays some of his creations in his shop during the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic on April 23, 2020. - Wyatt has transformed his topical tee shirt business to a topical face mask business now called Y Que Mask and PPE Trading Post, since the start of the coronavirus crisis. According to Wyatt, the mask featuring Dr. Anthony Fauci is a best seller, as are masks with characters from the Netflix hit "Tiger King" and also popular internet memes.

According to a report by The Washington Post, memes have helped the Americans in their stress-coping mechanism during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Pennsylvania State University, together with the University of California Santa Barbara, conducted a recent study about the impact of memes on the lives of the people.

Based on the research, people who usually view memes experience more positive emotions and higher humor levels. 

Last December, the researchers conducted an online survey involving 748 individuals. Based on the sample population, the age range of the participants sits from 18 to 88 years old.

Among the people who participated in the 2020 survey, 72% were white. 63% said they did not have any college degree. 54% of them were women.

The survey involved showing funny pictures or memes to the people. The participants have different responses and humor upon seeing the memes related to COVID-19.

Impact of COVID Memes and How Each Types Matter

In another report by NPR on Thursday, Oct.21, the researchers found out that those who regularly see memes related to the pandemic suffered from less stress. Those who are not used to viewing memes experience more stress.

In addition, the researchers also noticed that meme-exposed people could process information much better than those who don't view COVID-19 memes at all.

Of course, the variation of memes also has an effect on the viewer. According to the latest release, those people who are fond of viewing memes of baby animals or cute infants would likely adapt to stress better.

The study's lead author Jessica Gall Myrick said their research could alleviate the lives of people who are dealing with the pandemic struggle. Through the COVID-19 memes, many will feel more confident in their daily life.

"If we are all more conscious of how our behaviors, including time, spent scrolling, affect our emotional states, then we will better be able to use social media to help us when we need it and to take a break from it when we need that instead," the Pennsylvania State University professor stated in a release.

To view the study entitled "Consuming memes during the COVID pandemic: Effects of memes and meme type on COVID-related stress and coping efficacy," visit APA PsycNet.

Read Also: Coronavirus Best Medicine is Laughter! Reading Funny Memes Can Boost Your Immune System, Says Expert

More Memes About Coronavirus You Should See

Dealing with a pandemic is stressful, that's why we need something that could lighten our mood. 

Last year, we shared the best and funniest "Thanksgiving" memes during the COVID-19 lockdown. At that time, each family was celebrating the holidays inside their houses. These funny pictures will surely give you a dose of laughter during the virtual festivities.

Back in April 2021, a lot of people took COVID memes by storm across several social media sites. All over Twitter, many users shared different memes about the recreational activities that they will do after receiving their vax.

Related Article: Memes and Social Media Shape the Coronavirus Pandemic - Study Says

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Written by Joseph Henry 

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