A man exercising during lockdown to combat an outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) walks past a graffiti that reads "STOP 5G" in London
(Photo : REUTERS/Russell Boyce) A man exercising during lockdown to combat an outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) walks past a graffiti that reads "STOP 5G" in London, Britain, April 8, 2020.
5G Tower Burning
(Photo : Screenshot from Twitter of @binghu_sh)

A man exercising during lockdown to combat an outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) walks past a graffiti that reads
(Photo : REUTERS/Russell Boyce)
A man exercising during lockdown to combat an outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) walks past a graffiti that reads "STOP 5G" in London, Britain, April 8, 2020.

The 5G coronavirus conspiracy had spread like wildfire for the past few weeks. To clarify the truth about the 5G coronavirus conspiracy theory, an article from Fox News explained how it started and debunked the claims. Let's start with the effects of the spread of this fake news and damages had it done so far. 

5G Tower Burning
(Photo : Screenshot from Twitter of @binghu_sh)

READ ALSO: Truth About 5G Coronavirus Conspiracy Theory: Here's What Experts Say 

Recent Attacks Towards Telecommunications Companies

There have been incidents all over Europe and the United Kingdom where arsonists, vandals, and hooligans have been destroying cell phone towers. Vodafone's towers were attacked, including one serving a field hospital that is treating COVID-19 patients. Apart from destroying 20 towers, employees of telecommunication companies had been threatened.  

How The Conspiracy Theory Started

On Jan. 22, a small Belgian newspaper "Het Laatste Nieuws" published an interview along with Dr. Kris Van Kerckhoven, a general practitioner without any previous record. The headline wrote, "5G is life-threatening, and no one knows it."

Dr. Kerckhoven claimed that 5G was dangerous and might also be linked to the coronavirus. That's it. From a small newspaper as well as a minor physician, only a few have heard about covering an entire continent with panic and fear regarding 5G.

There are no scientific facts to back up the claim, and Dr. Kerckhoven had no prior credentials in radio frequency engineering, as well as no proof of how 5G might link to the coronavirus. Nothing at all but his word.

The article has since been deleted, but it didn't take long for the news to spread like wildfire. The article has since been deleted, but as word got out, big names like Amanda Holden, as well as other celebrities, had made such noise about it that people started believing it was real despite no evidence at all.

 
READ ALSO: [UPDATE] Coronavirus Conspiracy Theories Led to 5G Tower Arsons: UK Mobile Carriers are Politely Asking People to Stop 

The Clear Lack of Evidence

Dr. David Ludden wrote in Psychology Today, one of the primary reasons is that humans have a natural desire for control and security. The global pandemic is way beyond our control, and it threatens our security.

Most conspiracy theories followers claim that since no evidence proves them wrong or the lack of evidence for that matter would show that their theory is right.

Most of the electronics used nowadays emit some radiation one way or another. For people who don't know any better, that fact alone could frighten them as well as go-to steps as to signing petitions to ban electronics.

If emotionally committed to a belief, there will come a need to defend or best case for this 5G conspiracy, surrender the argument entirely.

The Solution For This 5G Conspiracy

"Think before you click." This is a popular quote to raise awareness of misinformation.  Before jumping into conclusions and joining the bandwagon, and don't rely on one source--research for more information from authority sites.

READ ALSO: Amanda Holden Receives Backlash After Sharing 'No to 5G' Petition as 5G Coronavirus Conspiracy Theory Continues Causing Fear to Some Essential Workers 

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