EPA Wants To Remove Complete Remove HFC AirCons to Reduce Carbon Emission in US—Targeted Date is 2100
(Photo : Photo credit should read DIRK WAEM/AFP via Getty Images) Illustration picture shows airconditioning units in Antwerp, Tuesday 23 July 2019. Temperatures in Belgium are rising towards record heights. BELGA PHOTO DIRK WAEM
EPA Wants To Remove Complete Remove HFC AirCons to Reduce Carbon Emission in US—Targeted Date is 2100
(Photo : Photo by Lukas Schulze/Getty Images) Steam and exhaust rise from the steel mill HKM Huettenwerke Krupp Mannesmann GmbH on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Duisburg, Germany. According to a report released by the European Copernicus Climate Change Service, 2016 is likely to have been the hottest year since global temperatures were recorded in the 19th century. According to the report the average global surface temperature was 14.8 degrees Celsius.

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) wants to remove the production of HFC (Hydrofluorocarbon) completely. If you don't know what HFC is, it is the chemical usually used in air conditioning systems and refrigerators.  

EPA Wants To Remove Complete Remove HFC AirCons to Reduce Carbon Emission in US—Targeted Date is 2100
(Photo : Photo credit should read DIRK WAEM/AFP via Getty Images)

The U.S. agency confirmed its anti-global warming program on Thursday, Sept. 23, claiming that the new plan could be completed by 2100. 

On the other hand, the new Earth-friendly project is expected to remove around 85% of HFC production and consumption by the time it is completed. 

"Cutting these climate 'super pollutants' protects our environment, strengthens our economy, and demonstrates that America is back when it comes to leading the world in addressing climate change," said Michael Regan, the current EPA Administrator, via CNET

EPA To Reduce HFC Consumption, Production

According to CNBC's latest report, the new move of the Environmental Protection Agency is a part of the Biden administration's first major regulatory action against domestic carbon emissions. 

EPA Wants To Remove Complete Remove HFC AirCons to Reduce Carbon Emission in US—Targeted Date is 2100
(Photo : Photo by Lukas Schulze/Getty Images)
Steam and exhaust rise from the steel mill HKM Huettenwerke Krupp Mannesmann GmbH on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Duisburg, Germany. According to a report released by the European Copernicus Climate Change Service, 2016 is likely to have been the hottest year since global temperatures were recorded in the 19th century. According to the report the average global surface temperature was 14.8 degrees Celsius.

Also Read: MIT Team Creates Light-Emitting Plants Which Have MASSIVE Tech, Energy Implications

It also marks the government's first national standards on HFCs. This is currently a major plan since the hydrofluorocarbons are now thousands of times more potent than carbon dioxide to increase the planet's temperature. 

Right now, various agencies and companies are doing their best to reduce the rising greenhouse emissions across the globe. These include the Biden administration's renewable energy plans. On the other hand, researchers are also developing wooden flooring that could generate clean energy.  

Goal of EPA's New Earth-Friendly Project

The new project of EPA aims to prevent global warming by up to Celsius global warming, which is expected to appear by 2100.

On the other hand, The Paris Agreement also stated that the U.S. agency plans to limit global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius. 

Recently, wildfires and other natural events connected to carbon emissions happened in Australia and other parts of the globe. As of the moment, scientific data reveals that more extreme weather disasters could still happen as carbon emissions become worst. 

For more news updates about EPA's anti-HFC plan and other programs to reduce global warming, always keep your tabs open here at TechTimes.  

Related Article: South Korea Gets 1.4 Gigawatt Floating Offshore Wind Farm Capable of Powering 1 Million Homes | Learn More

This article is owned by TechTimes

Written by: Griffin Davis

ⓒ 2021 TECHTIMES.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.