In a recent interview, will.i.am sat down with Dezeen to discuss his new line of sustainable products called Ekocycle. And it turns out that the Black Eyed Peas founder, entrepreneur and punctuation enthusiast has a lot of controversial things to say about 3D printing. We know this because he prefaces his entire interview by stating "I'm going to say something controversial." We've gathered up some of our favorite and enlightening things we learned from the Renaissance Man.

3D Printing Humans Will Happen in Our Lifetime
"So if you can print a liver or a kidney. God dang it, you're going to be able to print a whole freaking person. And that's scary. That's when it's like, whah! And I'm not saying I agree, but plausible growth would say that with multiple machines that print in different materials, you could print in protein an aluminium combo."

We're Going to Have to Come up with Some New Moral Rules
"New lessons are going to have to be implemented. For real. Now we're getting into a whole new territory. I don't know what year it was, Moses comes down with the 10 commandments and says "Thou shalt not..." He didn't say shit about 3D printing.

So new morals, new laws and new codes are going to have to be implemented. Humans - as great as we are - are pretty irresponsible. Ask the planet. Ask the environment."

3D Printing is Going to Lead To Star Trek-Style Teleportation
"You're starting with beef, and leathers, and body parts, eventually it will get more complex," he said. "It's basically 'Beam me up, Scotty', a 3D printer that disintegrates the source."

As Dezeen points out, experts say that the ability to print human tissue could be possible in 10 years. By that calculation, printing fully-functional humans that can act and make decisions on their own, seems like it's pretty far off. But hey, who are we to doubt the prophetic power of someone whose name sounds like a website. 

Head over to Dezeen to get more nuggets of wisdom. 

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