It's that time of year, when it seems like everyone is either getting married or having a baby, making you feel like it's time to start actively dating. First dates can be nerve-wracking and awkward, or exciting and refreshing.

Before you put yourself out there, you might want to read up on the latest first date trends. Here's what to expect on a first date in 2015.

There's no denying that mobile dating apps like Tinder have helped singles make a match — even if it's just for a first date rather than long-lasting love connection.

According to a recent dating survey from Chillisauce, 64 percent of people found a date by using a mobile dating app, with 18 percent finding a date on a online dating website. This means that you can expect to first make a virtual connection.

However, once you land your first date with a potential match, there is lots of dating trends to be on the lookout for.

"Our research started as a general idea around singles looking for love, and turned into something really specific about what really happens on that first date," said Chillisauce spokesperson Rachel Harrison. "The public has shared their secrets with us, and this survey is a first of its kind."

Ever wonder where are the single men have gone? Apparently, its to Tinder, and they have no plans on leaving the virtual dating realm to take you out in person.

Chillisauce surveyed 8,000 people from the UK about first dates, finding that 20 percent of men would rather keep swiping on Tinder and use other online dating sites than take someone out in a real-life date.

What's more shocking is that 21 percent of the men surveyed reported that they would decide not to show up to a first date to instead keep on flirting on dating apps. This means you can expect plans falling through if you are setting up a date after connecting on a dating app.

Ladies aren't that much more proactive when it comes to dating. The survey, titled "How to Find Love in 2015: Research Reveals What to Expect on Your First Date," found that 68 percent of women would rather hang out with friends or just stay in than go on a first date. This means guys can expect women opting for ladies' night over finally meeting up.

In case you are the lucky percentage who actually makes it on a date, then you should be aware that, according to survey results, more than half of people lie on the first date.

"What we really took away from the results is the lengths that both men and women will go to stand out and impress on a first date, rather than just tell fibs," Harrison said.

Well, at least they are lying to impress, but nevertheless, expect a few fibs here and there.

According to the survey, 19 percent of women lie about their profession on a first date, most commonly pretending to be a model, teacher or interior designer. Fifteen percent of ladies also lie about where they are from. More than one-third of women are also mostly likely to fib about their age to appear younger.

As far as men are concerned, 25 percent are likely to lie about their profession, most commonly saying they are an entrepreneur, pilot or investment banker. Eighteen percent lie about previous relationships including marriages.

You can expect a lie here are there from your date, but just don't expect them to fess up to it. Only a quarter of people surveyed reported they would confess their lie on the first date if they got caught up in it.

Lying on a first date should never be dating trend, but the survey also found some annoyances. Thirty-seven percent of men reported that they were turned off by a woman who looks over at her phone more than once during the date.

The biggest date turnoffs from both sexes surveyed include having your date eat from your plate and taking long bathroom breaks.

So, next time you are out with a potential match, remember honesty is key, and it's time to connect in person, so keep the phone away and stick to eating off your own plate. But why not spilt dessert?!

Photo: Gabriel Saldana | Flickr 

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