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WikiLeaks Leaks More Sony Documents: Secret Apple Deal And Bribery Investigation Revealed

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Just as the public might have begun forgetting about the Sony hack from last year, WikiLeaks has added 276,394 more documents, emails and financial files regarding Sony.

This batch of files is the second batch since the so-called "Guardians of Peace" hack of Sony Pictures last November.

The files, which are mostly legal and financial documents, have been released under the name "Sony Files Part 2," and they appear to have been released in conjunction with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's third anniversary in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, when he is staying to avoid extradition.

"This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation," said Assange. "It is newsworthy and at the centre of a geo-political conflict. It belongs in the public domain. WikiLeaks will ensure it stays there."

Interestingly enough, however, the documents also show a secret deal that Apple made with the company back in 2013, with Apple having requested 4K content for the testing of on-demand video services and for potential digital distribution.

The document highlights that while Apple may not be looking to immediately start offering 4K content, the company came to the decision after considering all of the options. The deal also suggests that we may actually see 4K content from Apple soon, likely tied to the upcoming new Apple TV set-top box, and the heavily rumored video-streaming service that the company will be offering soon.

Despite this, there has been speculation that the next generation Apple-TV would support 4K streaming in the past, however Apple denied that the device would initially support 4K video. It is possible, however, that Apple's lack of support for 4K may have changed now that the new Apple TV box will be announced at a press event in September or October, rather than earlier this month, as previously thought.

The letter was signed by Apple SVP of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue, as well as Jim Underwood, a then-Sony executive who now works at Facebook.

WikiLeaks, through its Twitter account, also directed users to a document that alleges an incident of bribery. And, the documents include a list of legal settlements, with Sony vice president of the 3D technology center getting a settlement of $300,000 after saying that she was being discriminated against because of her sex and race.

Michelle Leigh, the former employees "was a victim of sex stereotyping by an out of control senior vice-president," according to a letter sent to Sony by her lawyer.

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