Snails suddenly started to shoot up in the air from a mysterious hole that had also suddenly appeared along Exmouth Beach in Devon, UK Thursday. Beachgoers were stunned and no one could really explain how this could have happened, and why.

The area where the big, mysterious hole is sitting has been secured and will be closed to the public for the weekend, so officials can further monitor activities in and around the area.

James Dart, a kite surf instructor at the beach said he looked over and saw that there were big plumes of water that had come out of the beach. The sight reminded him of a geyser, as the water seemed to be "bubbling up." From where he was standing, it looked to be going about a foot above the beach. Dart said it was a "tremendous sight." The plant matter and snails that spewed up from inside the hole were, according to Dart, "something to spice things up in the rain."

An onlooker then reported the mysterious appearance of the hole to a Coastguard near Orcombe Point. The National Maritime Operations Center immediately dispatched a team to cordon off the area for safety.

The square cordon of 100 meters was placed around the snail-spewing hole measured at 15ft by 15ft (4.6m by 4.6m). Smaller holes were also starting to appear around the bigger, mysterious hole.

A civil engineer from the East Devon District Council (EDDC) also arrived at the scene and thought it necessary to enlarge the cordon because of the possibility that the hole may have a chamber underneath, much larger than previously thought. The Coastguard team also noted that the sands around the big hole were soft.

Devon is a coastal county known for its sandy beaches and wild moors. Popularly known for its surfing and outdoor activities, Devon is often visited by tourists and locals alike.

The EDDC also speculated that the hole might have come about due to heavy rainfall the day before; however, they still cannot fully explain the phenomena. They advise beachgoers and dog walkers to avoid going anywhere near the area for the time being.

ⓒ 2021 TECHTIMES.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.