Apple has bumped up the cameras on its latest iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus but some early users of the new smartphones have complained of grainy images in low-light conditions.

Turning off a feature helps in taking quality images via the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus even in low-light surroundings.

The iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus were equipped with an 8MP iSight camera and a 1.5MP FaceTime camera. The newest iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus have a 12MP primary camera and a 5MP selfie camera.

While the camera sensors have improved in the new-generation iPhones, Apple has also introduced the new Live Photo feature to the latest iPhones that shows a quick three second video of a photo that has been snapped. The small video includes 1.5 seconds before an image was clicked and 1.5 seconds after it was snapped.

Apple has flaunted the feature during the launch event and it also attracts many customers who use their smartphones for taking pictures regularly.

"A still photo captures an instant frozen in time. With Live Photos, you can turn those instants into unforgettable living memories. At the heart of a Live Photo is a beautiful 12‑megapixel photo. But together with that photo are the moments just before and after it was taken, captured with movement and sound," per Apple.

However, according to 9to5Mac, Live Photo is also blamed for reducing the quality of images being taken in low light. Experts suggest that disabling Live Photos from the Camera app can improve the quality of images significantly in low-light situations.

Live Photo is enable by default, which means that customers of the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus will have to turn off this feature manually if they want to snap high-quality pictures in dark backgrounds.

However, the difference in well-lit or normal lighting conditions is minimal, which means that iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus users should leave Live Photos on unless they are taking photos in dark shots.

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